Gods&Monsters: The Slayers Of Decadence

This is a complete playlist for our Gods&Monsters FATE campaign.
You can also find all the posts by clicking on Gods&Monsters category.

What started as gods bickering, and old pantheons fighting back; evolved into one of our best campaigns yet. A fantastic exploration of mythic family bonds, and what it takes to safe guard a community. While the audio quality suffers a little towards the beginning of the campaign (we are working on remastering the files) we’re still extremely proud of what we’ve created.

Once we’d finished recording the campaign, Raymond asked the GM (Ryan), and the other player (Eric), what their thoughts were. You can read that below the break.

Ryan, the GM: I’ll be brutally honest here: there were many ways in which running The Slayers of Decadence was not a fulfilling experience for me. We lost players along the way due to conflicting schedules. We drifted pretty far afield from the rules set out in the original Fate Worlds supplement, many of which we rarely used in the first place. As a GM, it seemed like I never had enough prep time before sessions, and I always managed to frustrate myself with lax bookkeeping.

That said, by the end of the campaign, once we had adjusted to the two-player dynamic and Ray and Eric had settled into their characters, it became a remarkable collaborative storytelling experience. By introducing the game’s central themes and allowing the players to develop them during play, I was able to let Ray and Eric do most of the game’s real heavy lifting. Together, we created a rich and exciting world, full of interesting characters and complex mythologies. The Slayers of Decadence would not have been nearly as successful if not for the heart, creativity and curiosity that Ray and Eric brought to their characters, and to the world. In the end, the story went places that none of us were quite expecting, which is always a pleasure for this GM.

Eric, player, Rhythm Bastard: So, other than a half-serious DnD 3.5 Campaign and a Dungeon Crawl Classics at a con, I was never part of a serious RPG experience. The only exposure I’ve had to something like that was Rag-Nerd-Rok’s Eclipse Phase. I knew how it was supposed to go, but at our first session I remember feeling a little out of depth. In the beginning I still thought of this as a game, my character fulfilling the “Fighter” role with Raymond being the “Rogue” and Matt playing the “Sorcerer.” Thankfully, I had an experienced GM in Ryan who knew the right questions to ask and a veteran RPer in Raymond to lead the scenes.

If you cut away all the fringes and loose threads of repeated botched roles, metagaming and jokes of varying success, you get a good story told by three people using some dice and imagination.There were definitely plenty of moments (the freeing of Firefly, Fillion and Landris’s first meeting, the entire goddamn ending, etc.) where we can look back and say “Damn, we made that!” This, more than anything, should sell the average person on the wonders of tabletop gaming. It’s a collaborative storytelling experience that we can get invested in because we’re all writing it.

Raymond, with the final word: This was a great experience, both in terms of gaming and friendship. It was a pleasure working and playing with Ryan and Eric. At times I felt like I might be pushing and handling Eric a little too much; but he didn’t seem to mind. The why Ryan managed to work our spontaneous parenting theme into the campaign was fantastic. Although we didn’t see many monsters.
While this was our first FATE campaign, it will not be our last.

 

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