the crusading couch episode 2: traits we like in players

in this episode of our gaming theory podcast we talk about desirable traits in players. we talk about things we like as GMs and as players ourselves. we also get VERY side tracked, but it’s all useful and fun. this one’s a little longer than the last but only by 20 minutes.

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farewell from the past, I’m Raymond.

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5 comments

  1. I would argue that providing information to players beforehand to make sure people are interested is not an effective strategy, because that can backfire for certain people who go “Oh, all this information I have to look at and I’m already not that interested. Great…” and make them even more left behind and uninterested. For some people they have to actually be brought into the game and actively immersed before they get the drive to look things up about the world and rules.

    Group of characters that need to stay together, ey Agwu?

    Having played in Realms of Light, I still cannot think of a reason why he couldn’t have been a demon cultist. It would have been interesting to see how he dealt with the big bad being a demon.

    A lot of the time giving feedback to the GM seems to make little to no difference. Like, I’m pretty sure that the only time I’ve seen feedback actually implemented was when we told Will not to use “If you turn around then you see this” descriptions.

    Will: Did you remember to give your character a name? 😄

    To be fair, the robot NPC in Star Wars would have been fine… /if/ you had actually rolled. I’d also like to mention, I quite liked my sire in your vampire game and he was like the most Gary Stu character of them all in terms of power. Even though I was pretty much helpless against him, I never really felt like my control had been taken away from me even though it technically had… Yeah, I don’t know how to describe it really.

    I also really don’t think you should try to make your players attached to your NPCs regardless of your own attachment to them. Players will develop the most random of attachments to characters, you shouldn’t try to force it.

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    1. there isn’t much more i have to say about your comments then ” i agree” and “that’s an interesting point”

      the first paragraph in-particular. the giving too much information thing reminds me of how some people are turned off by great weighty tomes of rules.

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    2. “A lot of the time giving feedback to the GM seems to make little to no difference. Like, I’m pretty sure that the only time I’ve seen feedback actually implemented was when we told Will not to use “If you turn around then you see this” descriptions.”

      the was an immediate change due to feedback, sometimes it takes longer to implement a change in story telling style. or the feedback might be received but only partly responded to. obviously you don’t have to give feed back to your GM’s; but if they ask for it, and you have something worth while to say you should give it. GM/storyteller/keeper should be constantly trying to improve and push the boundaries of what they can do. it’s ok if those improvements take a while though.

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